• The good old days

    goodolddays3The inconvenient “good old” days contained some very “good old” ecological ways.

    I grew up seventy-two years ago in a small seaside town in England. To anyone under thirty-five, seventy-two is ancient; the rest of us marvel at how fast time passes. With no refrigeration, you shopped once a week or you ate something out of a can for dinner.

    Before plastic, people all over the world used some sort of cloth shopping bag. It might be a fancy store-bought item or something simple, sewn from a piece of left over cotton. The burlap that potatoes used to come in made useful shopping bags.

    Thankfully the cloth bag has re-appeared, but the supermarkets still have thick rolls of smaller plastic bags for vegetables and bulk items and the ‘I will not disintegrate for about twenty thousand years’ plastic bags are still very much in place.

    [Read More...]

  • “Greening” the Foods We Eat or, Current Applications of Benjamin Franklin’s “Green Economics” – January 6, 2009

    greening1

    DID YOU KNOW?

  • Food safety experts have identified the five most common food-borne pathogens. The “Big 5,” easily transmitted through food and the cause of severe illness are: Enterohemorrhagic E.coli or Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, Hepatitis A virus, Norovirus, and Salmonella Shigella. Salmonella is one of the most common pathogens and it has many different strains. Salmonella Shigella is only one strain. Since 1971 there have been at least 20 outbreaks of food-related poisoning. [Read More...]
  • Clams and Crayfish Used to Study Waterborne Contaminants – January 6, 2009

    Asian clams collected at Frenchman's Bar, Vancouver

    Asian clams collected at Frenchman's Bar, Vancouver

    Recent water quality monitoring efforts in the Columbia River have relied upon the analysis of clam tissue to determine the levels of dangerous toxins that have been absorbed by aquatic organisms. In Vancouver, high levels of PCBs, a cancer-causing agent, have been identified in clam tissues taken from samples in front of Alcoa at the Port of Vancouver, and downstream toward the mouth of the flushing channel to Vancouver Lake. [Read More...]

  • Local View: Stormwater Pollution is a Critical Issue for Clark County – Sunday, December 14, 2008

    Flooding Chehalis, WA, on I-5 corridor.  State Stormwater regulations work to alleviate stresses of high level storm events that can cause major flooding.  These events represent only 1% of the rainfall in our state, yet do the most significant damage.

    Flooding Chehalis, WA, on I-5 corridor. State Stormwater regulations work to alleviate stresses of high level storm events that can cause major flooding. These events represent only 1% of the rainfall in our state, yet do the most significant damage.

    This editorial was published by the Columbian newspaper:

    Sunday, December 14, 2008
    By Dvija Bertish, Rosemere Neighborhood Association and Lauren Goldberg, Toxics and Conservation Director, Columbia Riverkeeper

    The recent story regarding the City of Vancouver’s move to increase protections for our local creeks and rivers from the stormwater that carries thousands of pounds of heavy metals, pesticides, and oil from city streets should be welcome news to everyone who values clean water, salmon or the chance for your family to enjoy a swim in a local river or lake. [Read More...]

  • FISH IN VANCOUVER LAKE ARE CONTAMINATED AND UNSAFE FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION – November 1, 2004

    bass

    Largemouth Bass

    Anglers frequent fishing spots along the Columbia River and Vancouver Lake, and have done so for many years. However, Toxic Monitoring Data from the Washington State Department of Ecology indicates that fish in Vancouver Lake are not safe to eat. This is particularly dangerous for low-income folks who fish in this area out of necessity. [Read More...]

  • Elevated levels of toxins in fish in Portland harbor – June 16, 2004

    ELEVATED LEVELS OF PCBs IN RESIDENT FISH FROM PORTLAND HARBOR

    Press Release from Oregon Health Services

    June 16, 2004

    Contact: Bonnie Widerburg (503) 731-4180
    Technical contact: Dave Stone or Ken Kauffman, DHS (503) 731-4012

    Elevated levels of PCBs in resident fish from Portland Harbor
    ——————————————————————————–

    The Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS), in cooperation with Multnomah County Health Department, is advising the public today of high levels of PCBs in fish caught from Portland Harbor, in the lower Willamette River. [Read More...]

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